Voice of the Books | August 2021

Date:

Should I Stay Or Should I Go?
The Clash were never known for prophetic travel advice. But our Green, Amber and Red list choices have never been so confusing. Still whether you’re passing time at an airport, on a Cornish beach or at home in the garden we have a selection of handpicked Summer Reads all £2 off to help you relax and lose yourself in a good book. Wayne

Miss Benson’s Beetle by Rachel Joyce – £8.99

In a devastating moment of clarity, Margery Benson abandons her dead-end job and advertises for an assistant to accompany her on an expedition. She is going to travel to the other side of the world to search
for a beetle that may or may not exist. Enid Pretty, in her unlikely pink travel suit, is not the companion Margery had in mind. And yet together they will be drawn into an adventure that will exceed every expectation.

The Moth and the Mountain by Ed Caesar – 10.99

The untold story of Britain’s most mysterious mountaineering legend – Maurice Wilson – and his
heroic attempt to climb Everest. Alone. In the 1930s, as official government expeditions set their sights on conquering Everest, Maurice Wilson conceived his own plan: he would fly a Gipsy Moth aeroplane from England to Everest, crash land on its lower slopes, then become the first person to reach its summit. Wilson didn’t know how to climb. He barely knew how to fly. But he had pluck, daring and a vision.

Diary of a Young Naturalist by Dara McAnulty £9.99

Evocative, raw and beautifully written, this very special book vividly explores the natural world from the perspective of an autistic teenager juggling homework, exams and friendships alongside his life as a conservationist and environmental activist. With a sense of awe and wonder, Dara describes in meticulous detail, encounters in his garden and the wild. The power and warmth of his words also draw an affectionate and moving portrait of a close-knit family making their way in the world.

Humankind by Rutger Bregman £9.99

Human beings, we’re taught, are by nature selfish, governed by self-interest. ‘Humankind’ makes a new argument: that it is realistic, as well as revolutionary, to assume that people are good. By thinking the worst of others, we bring out the worst in our politics and economics too. In this major book, Rutger Bregman takes some of the world’s most famous studies and events and reframes them, providing a new perspective on the last 200,000 years of human history.

The Lying Life of Adults by Elena Ferrante £8.99

Giovanna’s pretty face has changed: it’s turning into the face of an ugly, spiteful adolescent. But is she seeing things as they really are? Where must she look to find her true reflection and a life she can claim as her own? Giovanna’s search leads her to two kindred cities that fear and detest one another: the Naples of the heights, which assumes a mask of refinement, and the Naples of the depths, a place of excess and vulgarity. Adrift, she vacillates between these two cities, falling into one then climbing back to the other.

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